Two South Australian men to face court on alleged child abuse-related offences

Child_Exploitation

This is a joint release between Australian Federal Police and South Australia Police

Two South Australian men are expected to face court today (Wednesday, 31 March 2021) charged with child abuse-related offences by the South Australia Joint Anti Child Exploitation Team (SA JACET).

The men, aged 37 and 38, were arrested yesterday (30 March 2021) after an investigation that stemmed from a separate SA JACET inquiry last year into a 39-year-old man.

Police will allege they found records of online conversations between the 39-year-old and a 27-year-old Victorian man about the sexual abuse of children.

When Victorian JACET investigators arrested the Melbourne man earlier this year and forensically analysed his devices, they allegedly found links to the 37-year-old and 38-year-old men in South Australia.

The two men arrested yesterday are allegedly known to each other.

Investigators from SA JACET, which comprises AFP and SA Police officers, allegedly found a large amount of child abuse material on a USB device when they searched the 38-year-old's home.

The 38-year-old, from Adelaide, is expected to face Adelaide Magistrate's Court today charged with:

  • One count of producing child abuse material through a carriage service, contrary to section 474.23 of the Criminal Code Act 1995 (Cth). The maximum penalty for this offence is 15 years' imprisonment;
  • Two counts of aggravated possession of child exploitation material, contrary to section 63A(1)(a) of the Criminal Law Consolidation Act 1935 (SA). The maximum penalty for this offence is seven years' imprisonment;
  • Two counts of possession of child exploitation material, contrary to section 63A of the Criminal Law Consolidation Act 1935 (SA). The maximum penalty for this offence is five years' imprisonment.

The 37-year-old, from Port Lincoln, is expected to appear in Port Lincoln Magistrate's Court charged with:

  • Two counts of producing child exploitation material, contrary to section 63(a) Criminal Law Consolidation Act 1935 SA.
  • One count of indecent filming, contrary to section 26D of the Summary Offences Act 1953 (SA). The maximum penalty for this offence is four years' imprisonment.
  • One count of aggravated possession of child exploitation material, contrary to section 63A(1)(a) of the Criminal Law Consolidation Act 1935. The maximum penalty for this offence is seven years' imprisonment;
  • One count of disseminating child exploitation material, contrary to section 63(b) of the Criminal Law Consolidation Act.

Police are working to identify the children in the vision seized from the warrants, to check on their welfare and remove them from harm. Inquiries are also ongoing into any other potential offending.

AFP Detective Superintendent Gail McClure said this investigation again shows how closely police around Australia work together to combat the exploitation and abuse of children.

"Our common goal is to protect children, wherever they live, and ensure anyone who tries to harm them is identified and brought before the courts," she said.

SAPOL Detective Superintendent James Blandford said the strong partnership between the AFP and SAPOL provides our community a powerful force to protect children and hold offenders to account.

"The offences relating to child exploitation are significant and seriously damaging to victims and the community as a whole, as a result of the traumatic physical and emotional scars inflicted by the abuse," he said.

"Our community must tackle the question of child exploitation head-on and collectively find an answer to it."

Members of the public who have any information about people involved in child abuse and exploitation are urged to call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or report online.

If you or someone you know are impacted by child sexual abuse and online exploitation there are support services available.

Advice and support for parents and carers about how they can help protection children online can be found at ThinkUKnow, an AFP-led education program designed to prevent online child sexual exploitation.

Note to media:

Use of term 'CHILD ABUSE' MATERIAL NOT 'CHILD PORNOGRAPHY'

The correct legal term is Child Abuse Material – the move to this wording was among amendments to Commonwealth legislation in 2019 to more accurately reflect the gravity of the crimes and the harm inflicted on victims.

Use of the phrase "child pornography" is inaccurate and benefits child sex abusers because it:

  • indicates legitimacy and compliance on the part of the victim and therefore legality on the part of the abuser; and
  • conjures images of children posing in 'provocative' positions, rather than suffering horrific abuse.

Every photograph or video captures an actual situation where a child has been abused.

Media enquiries

AFP Media: (02) 5126 9297

National Security Hotline

Read the AFP Annual Report 2019-20

The Australian Centre to Counter Child Exploitation

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